Landscape Photography Settings Part 2

Landscape Photography Settings Part 2

In our previous article, we spoke about the three primary settings that affect how the camera operates and in theory, how you can use these settings to create beautiful landscape images. So, as this is part two of that blog post, we’re going to carry on from where we left off yesterday. If you’re not all caught up on the first part of this feature, then check out Landscape Photography Settings Part 1. Let’s talk about the landscape photography settings that you can use on your camera when capturing these types of images with wedding photographs in mind...

Image Source: www.katherineannrose.com

Landscape Photography Settings #1: Image Quality – The quality of a photograph tells you everything you need to know about the photographer and the services that they are offering to you. So, think of it from a client’s perspective when you’re shooting your images. What would you find appealing about another photographer’s work? Maybe the style and their creative ideas, but ultimately, you’ll be looking for that special quality. So, when shooting landscape images, just because they’re busy with lots of factors to focus on, doesn’t mean that the quality of your image should be lacking in any way.

As a wedding photographer, attention to detail should be your forte, so, you should want the largest, most detailed photographs that you can capture with your equipment to show off that detail. Shooting on anything less than a lossless RAW format will cause a major loss in your image quality. If you are limited by memory or processing power and you don't need the image quality, you can choose an appropriately compressed format (JPEG).

Landscape Photography Settings #2: Exposure Bias – What is exposure bias? We wouldn’t blame you if you were asking yourself that very question. Exposure bias basically just tells the camera's algorithm how to control the exposure within the photographs. While the camera has an ideal average brightness value in mind, you can use this setting to tell it to purposely under or overshoot this value, which will of course produce an image with controlled exposure bias.  

For some landscape settings, you may want to increase the exposure bias a fair amount to pick up more of the details from further away in your shot. However, many photographers frequently use this setting to underexpose their photos since, when shooting in RAW, data is much more recoverable from underexposed areas than overexposed areas and this also causes the camera to use a lower ISO value if ISO is being controlled automatically.

Image Source: www.katherineannrose.com

Landscape Photography Settings #3: Exposure Bracketing - Bracketing allows you to have the camera shoot at various levels of exposure in a sequence of photos. Pretty cool right?! This is very useful when you don't have the time to retake mistakes and you want to ensure you get the right exposure, so, if you’re not sure what to do or how to set the exposure on your camera to capture that once in a lifetime shot, be sure to check out your user manual or do some research online about your camera model to find access to this setting on your camera.

Landscape Photography Settings #4: White Balance - If you are shooting in RAW, white balance is one of the most easily fixed elements in post-processing, so do not worry about getting it right beforehand. Photographers usually leave the camera on auto and fix it later on. However, if you are shooting JPEGs, it can be significantly more difficult to fix in post. To accurately guess the best setting to use, you will need to understand the colour of light that each setting is designed for and match that to your scene. Another strategy involves test photos of a neutral grey card and then using the setting that gets you closest to grey in the photo. While this gives you a technically accurate result, white balance can be a stylistic choice and technically accurate is not always best.

Image Source: www.katherineannrose.com

We hope that the tips that we’ve included within this two-part article about landscape photography settings will help you to capture amazing images! Nature, however, won't always provide you with enough light or the right conditions to use ideal settings. Take the opportunity to experiment, as the more you experiment and practice, the more you’ll learn and the faster you will be able to choose the right settings for any given scene, so get out there and go shoot! Needs some inspiration? Check out some landscape wedding photography ideas...  

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