Landscape Photography Settings Part 1

Landscape Photography Settings Part 1

Have you ever wondered how professional wedding photographers double their skills by taking landscape wedding photographs, as well as the usual wedding portrait and ceremony images? Maybe you've been there yourself, camera in hand, but not had your photos turn out the way you wanted. Well wonder no more, because in today’s article, we’re going to talk about the landscape photography settings that you can adjust your camera to. This will enhance the quality of your landscape images when taking wedding photographs on a paying gig.

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What Are Landscape Photography Settings? - Your camera is a very clever and complex device. Even some professional photographers don’t know where to find certain settings on their model of camera or indeed have no idea what certain adjustments do to their photographs. But, the secret to producing amazing images is of course to learn the craft of photography inside and out. Nowadays, this is made easy for photographers, as everything can all be found on one device and these settings will ultimately affect the results of your images. So, with today’s technology, all you need to do is do a little research on your particular model of camera to find where certain settings are hiding and read up on what the different types of settings do to achieve the best results.

Landscape photography settings are pretty self-explanatory, it’s a type of setting on your camera which allows your camera to produce the best quality photographs when in scenic settings. This is an ideal thing to learn as a wedding photographer, as many of your wedding clients throughout the years will ask for you to take their photographs after the ceremony, which could be in a scenic setting. This of course all depends on the setting of the wedding venue, but more often than not, you’ll have the chance to capture some really beautiful landscape images in a rural setting.

Image Source: www.katherineannrose.com

Camera Modes - There are three primary settings that affect how a camera operates. These factors are known as; aperture, shutter speed and ISO. We’ve talked about these three quite a lot in recent articles, but that’s just because they’re such a huge factor when talking about the foundations of photography. You’ll come across these terms quite a lot when researching things about improving your photography and learning generally about your camera. All three of these affect the amount of light entering the camera, but also have other effects. A camera's modes simply decide how these basic settings will be controlled. Just in case you’re new to the photography gig and have no idea what any of these terms mean or what they do as camera settings, we’ll give you a quick run through...

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  1. Aperture - In basic terms, aperture refers to the size of the hole that allows light into the camera through the camera lens. It is measured as a ratio between the focal length and the size of the hole. Aperture's second major effect is depth of field. This basically translates to how far away from the scene is in focus beyond the target. The best landscape images usually have an interesting foreground as well as what’s in the landscape itself. How small of an aperture (large depth of field) will you need to keep what you want in focus? A middle aperture (such as f/10 or f/12) is usually enough, when focused slightly beyond the foreground, to keep everything in focus. This will give you a clear and crisp image, perfect for capturing the details of an entire scene throughout your photograph.

  1. Shutter Speed - Shutter speed controls the amount of time the camera is measuring or sensing the light, usually by controlling when the shutter opens and closes. In most images, shutter speed is used to completely stop any motion, both of the subject and of the camera, if you’re not using a tripod. Just a little bit of motion in your photo will make it blurry, usually in an unintended and unappealing way. A tripod should be a part of your photography armoury anyway, as it’s a key part of your equipment needs, but you’re definitely going to need to use a tripod to get that balance throughout your landscape photographs.

  1. ISO - The ISO setting on a digital camera controls how sensitive to light the camera will be. Before the time of digital technology, a photographer had to choose how sensitive he wanted the film to be when preparing to film or photograph a location. Luckily, with digital cameras we can control this easily by using our camera settings and now we can talk about what landscape photography settings you can use to achieve the most out of your camera... Stay tuned for part 2 of this article to find out what they are!
Image Source: www.katherineannrose.com
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