Experimenting With Wedding Backdrops Part 1

Experimenting With Wedding Backdrops Part 1

So, you’re a wedding photographer huh? Had a lot of gigs, gained lots of experience, that kind of thing? Well that’s great and all, but ask yourself this... Are you paying attention to the finer details when you’re out there doing your thing at the wedding reception? (more than likely getting a bit shutter happy as many photographers do!). Well, we can’t blame you for that, but there’s a fine line between quality and quantity when it comes down to talking about wedding images.

See many photographers (especially wedding photographers) fall under the trap of confusing quality and quantity with each other. A good wedding photographer will have a fair size of images to choose from after the big day is over and done with. You know, when the pictures have been sent over to the Bride and Groom to look through and then they pick out which ones they would like to be printed or enlarged? Well, that’s great if they have tonnes of images to choose from and they like most of them, but what’s not great is having countless images to choose from, but none of them are really worth choosing... Imagine if that happened to you! It would really suck right?!

This is the saddest part about being a Bride or indeed the Groom of a wedding, because once the day is done, it’s done. So, if the images aren’t what they were expecting or hoping for, well that’s that. It’s too late. So today, we’re going to make sure that doesn’t happen to any of your clients. Photographers, we’re calling out to you now! So, if you’re reading this post, be sure to pay extra attention, because we really don’t want displeased clientele and we most certainly wouldn’t allow this to happen on our watch! So, sit back, grab a pen and take notes (or at least just grab a screen shot of what we've got to say) …

Why Are Wedding Backdrops So Important? - Uh hello? This should be pretty self-explanatory, but sadly the topic does need addressing. There are Bride and Grooms out there who have felt a little shall we say, underwhelmed with their wedding photographs. Why? Well because the shot was candid and all and the Bride looked pretty which was great, but the backdrop totally sucked. This is a classic mistake and it was made by the photographer. Now we hate to point and name names. But if you’re a wedding photographer who just points and shoots willy-nilly, you’ve got to cut it out! Yes, you will capture many photographs, but you will end up as the latter photographer which we briefly spoke about earlier. You want your images to be worth choosing right?

The Close Ups (wedding backdrops) - Let's start with the close ups! This will typically involve a close up of the Bride’s facial expressions, hair, makeup and veil if she is wearing one. Now, depending on how much background space you have to play with in the image, this will effect what you need to consider. If you get close enough, the background will become non-existent of a sense and the whole frame will become taken up with the image in shot. This type of closeup will create beautiful photography, showing off every detail in the frame. You can see this in the image just below as an example of what we mean...

Image Source: www.unsplash.com

Another type of close up will be almost identical to this one, but there may be some spare space on the outskirts of the main subject within the image. Any background that is showing on the edges of a subject in focus should be as plain as possible, or at least all following the same tone(s) of colour to keep the image looking crisp, clear and professional. The last thing the background should do is take away from the subject in shot!

Image Source: www.unsplash.com

Another type of close up will still capture the details of the subject(s) in shot, but it will show a little more of the Bride and Groom’s body, including their hands, feet or even faces. So, this will of course leave more negative space to play with. Just remember that the subjects are the main point of the photograph, so don’t choose a noisy wedding backdrop to take your photograph in front of. A nice choice of wedding backdrop around the venue may be an archway, a stone wall, gardens or even the steps of the venue. You can see an example of this just below...

Image Source: www.unsplash.com

Ideal Colours To Photograph Against (wedding backdrops) - With wedding backdrops, the colours are not as restricting as you may think. White, pink, lemon, peachy and stone tones all work really well for traditional wedding photographs. It’s not so much the colours that you need to pay attention to, but the texture and how many tones are involved in a background. Also, some things just shouldn’t be in a photo altogether of this kind. In all fairness, brickwork at the venue or anything plain or floral will work well. Even a field or park like setting will work well as a backdrop!

Image Source: www.unsplash.com

For example, if you’re taking an image of the Bride and Groom at the wedding reception, try not to include any unnecessary subjects within the frame. For example, a vacant chair or messy table behind the pair. Take them to a picturesque corner of the party or gather a few candid shots of them sharing their first dance of the couple. Never ever leave before taking an image of this moment unless the couple have specified that they do not want this photographed by you. We can’t see this being likely, but photographers leaving before this moment has been known to happen. So, just don’t let that be you! We’ve included an example just here for you to gather an idea of what we mean...

Image Source: www.unsplash.com

We hope that you’ve enjoyed part 1 of our article about wedding backdrops! If you found it useful, be sure to stick around because we’re not through with the topic just yet... Later on this week, part 2 of the article will be ready for viewing. So, until then, follow us on Instagram @weddit.io for further wedding photography inspo!

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